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Crooked Billet Students Memorialize Sandy Hook Victims through Books

Crooked Billet Elementary School students researched victims of the Sandy Hook school shooting and donated a book in their honor to the library.

Crooked Billet Elementary School third-grader McKenzie Kemble selects a book from the Sandy Hook memorial bookcase in the school library. Credit: Hatboro-Horsham School District
Crooked Billet Elementary School third-grader McKenzie Kemble selects a book from the Sandy Hook memorial bookcase in the school library. Credit: Hatboro-Horsham School District

Crooked Billet Elementary School students reflected on the tragedy of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in the days around the Dec. 14 anniversary by reading school library books that had been donated in honor of the victims.

Last year, students in Tiffany Hood’s fifth-grade class were so moved by the story of Sandy Hook, each student selected one of the 26 victims of the shooting to study and learn about their interests. To finish the project, they selected a book to donate to the school library in honor of the victim they researched. Each book was given a name plate with the person’s name and the reason it was selected. 

“The books selected by the students reflect something about each child and adult, whether it was a hobby they had, a sport they played or a topic they were passionate about,” Hood said in a press release. “We wanted to do something to memorialize the lives lost in this tragic event. The students wanted to do something to honor them.” 

Some of the books donated were “I Want to be a Firefighter,” for Daniel Barden, who wanted to be a firefighter like his uncle; “Heartprints,” for Allison Wyatt, who liked to perform random acts of kindness; “Many Ways to be a Soldier,” for Jesse Lewis, who played with toy soldiers and carried them in his Spiderman lunchbox; “Under the Sea,” for Emilie Parker, because she carried pencils and markers everywhere in order to draw pictures or cards for people; and “The Autism Acceptance Book,” for teacher Rachel D’Avino, because she was passionate about helping children with autism.

“It was a horrific event,” Hood said. “But hopefully this project will ensure those students, teachers and staff won’t be forgotten. We can remember not only the tragedy of Sandy Hook, but, more importantly, who they were.”

Yikes! January 11, 2014 at 12:26 PM
http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2013/12/all-the-proof-youll-ever-need-that-the-newtown-shooting-was-a-theatrical-performance-2848514.html
Mike Shortall Sr January 12, 2014 at 12:52 AM
Wow, Yikes ... That's quite the stretch and incredibly cold. Crap like that doesn't deserve the light of day.
Leigh January 12, 2014 at 09:09 AM
What a wonderful tribute. I love that the kids really got to know the students. This shows such great respect and empathy. Great job.
Karen Vandegrift Maldonado January 12, 2014 at 06:33 PM
The credit needs to go to the fifth grade class of 2013. They had the idea. The bookshelf... and the money donated for the books was given by them. It was also not only Mrs. Hood's class but Mr. Dufner's as well that took part in this last year, before moving on to middle school. I personally worked on this project as my son was in this 5th grade class last year. I want both classes to be given the credit of this amazing heartwarming idea they had!!

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